[THE INDEX] tab allows readers to access the index on its own, in text form:

  • use the A to Z bar to quickly go to a topic

  • enter Ctrl-F to find a word or phrase

  • or browse it, simply to explore

[THE REPORT] tab allows readers to reference the index side-by-side with The Mueller Report, both in PDF form:

  • the PDFs can be scrolled through, zoomed into/out of, searched by page number, and printed directly from the website

  • if using the index alongside the printed book, the most useful editions are those that retain the original pagination of the Department of Justice report; for instance, The Mueller Reportauthored by the Washington Post staff, published by Simon & Schuster 

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Now, start with a research topic. For example, let's say you want to research the Mueller team's discriminating use of these related terms:

                                   

  COLLUSION         CONSPIRACY            COORDINATION           

 

  • Find the entry for “collusion” in the Index (or look for the wordstem “collude”). 

  • Then, for each page reference in the entry, go to the corresponding page in the Report. 

  • Do the same for the other terms, “coordination” and “conspiracy.”

 

Here is a sample of Notes made from consulting the Index as described above:

SELECTIONS FROM THE INDEX

collusion

     discussion, I.­2, 180–181

conspiracy

     charges of, I.174

     discussion, I.2, 180–181

coordination, potential, I.2, 180–181

     foreign agent statutes, I.181–183

          governing law, I.181–182

     not established, I.66, 127, 131

RELATED PASSAGES IN THE MUELLER REPORT

page I.2

"But collusion is not a specific offense or theory of liability found in the United States Code, nor is it a term of art in federal criminal law."

 

page I.174

"On February 16, 2018, a federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment charging 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities . . . with violating U.S. criminal laws in order to interfere with U.S. elections and political processes. The indictment charges all of the defendants with conspiracy . . ."

 

page I.127

"Ambassador Kislyak continued his efforts to interact with Campaign officials with responsibility for the foreign-policy portfolio-among them Sessions and Gordon-in the weeks after the Convention. The Office did not identify evidence in those interactions of coordination

beween the Campaign and the Russian government."

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